Phoenix PR Firm Launches Campaign To Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

Neurodegenerative disease is the fastest-growing cause of death in the world. The autism epidemic shares the same timing, trajectory and more. Coincidence or correlation? This website connects the dots. Misinformation and mismanagement are contributing to the global epidemic of brain disease in people of all ages.

Alzheimer’s disease alone is killing 50-100 million people now and spreading fast. Experts suggest that the prevalence of brain disease will quadruple by 2050, if not sooner. Meanwhile, death rates from heart disease and cancer are dropping globally due to advances in nutrition, medicine and disease management.

The epidemic is worse in some regions of the world than others. Finland and Iceland are at the top of the list. The United States is third on the list, where deaths from Alzheimer’s disease increased 71 percent from 2000 to 2013. Over the same timeframe, deaths attributed to heart disease decreased 14 percent.

At a cost of $236 billion a year, Alzheimer’s disease is already the most expensive disease in the United States. The disease saw a 15.7 percent jump over 2014 numbers–the largest increase of all major causes of death. It accounted for 108,227 documented deaths (and thousands of undiagnosed and undocumented ones) in the U.S. alone in 2015. A similar pattern is emerging around the globe–some regions much more than others. In the U.S., nearly one in every five Medicare dollars is spent on people with Alzheimer’s or another dementia. These costs will continue to increase sharply as baby boomers age and the prion contagion spreads, soaring to more than $1 trillion in 2050.

The epidemic is more widespread than anyone knows. Physicians are withholding millions of diagnoses from patients and their families. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, physicians in the U.S. only inform 45 percent of patients about their Alzheimer’s diagnosis. The same suppression is likely at work in most countries. Meanwhile, millions more go undiagnosed and misdiagnosed. Unfortunately, misinformed caregivers, family members, healthcare workers and others are caught in the crossfire of a deadly contagion known as a prion.

Alzheimer's disease transmissible

“This will be the most important documentary ever produced about brain disease,” said Gary Chandler, president of Crossbow Communications. “Thanks to mismanagement and the widespread contamination of food and water, brain disease now has more to do with neurotoxins than it does with normal aging and genetics.”

The most common forms of neurodegenerative disease include Alzheimer’sParkinson’s and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease–the most aggressive and infectious of them all. According to Nobel Prize Laureate Stanley Prusiner, they are all part of the same disease spectrum—prion disease. It’s also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). The operative word is “transmissible.”

prion disease and biosolids

Dr. Stanley Prusiner, an American neuroscientist from the University of California at San Francisco, earned a Nobel Prize in 1997 for discovering and characterizing deadly prions and prion disease. He claims that all TSEs are caused by prions. President Obama awarded Prusiner the National Medal of Science in 2010 to recognize the importance of his research. According to Prusiner, TSEs all are on the same disease spectrum, which is more accurately described as prion (PREE-on) disease Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is at the extreme end of the spectrum.

prion disease spectrum

Prions are unstoppable. The pathogen spreads through the bodily fluids and cell tissue of its victims. The blood, saliva, mucus, milk, urine and feces of victims are infectious. Once unleashed on the environment, prions remain infectious. In fact, they migrate, mutate and multiply.

Not only are homes and hospitals exposed to the prion pathogen, so are entire sewage treatment systems and their by-products. Wastewater treatment plants are prion incubators. The sewage sludge and wastewater released are spreading disease far and wide.

Dr. Claudio Soto prion research

Studies confirm that people and animals dying of prion disease contaminate the environment around them with prions. Claudio Soto, PhD, professor of neurology at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and his colleagues recently found human prions in urine. Soto also confirmed that plants uptake prions and are infectious and deadly to those who consume such plants. Therefore, humans, wildlife and livestock are vulnerable to prion disease via plants grown on land treated with sewage sludge and reclaimed sewage water.

prion research Joel Pedersen

Prion researcher Dr. Joel Pedersen, from the University of Wisconsin, found that prions become 680 times more infectious in certain soils. Pedersen also found that sewage treatment does not inactivate prions. Therefore, prions are lethal, mutating, migrating and multiplying everywhere sewage is dumped.

“Our results suggest that if prions enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most of the agent would bond to sewage sludge, survive anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids,” Pedersen said. “Land application of biosolids containing prions represents a route for their unintentional introduction into the environment. Our results emphasize the importance of keeping prions out of municipal wastewater treatment systems. Prions could end up in sewage treatment plants via slaughterhouses, hospitals, dental offices and mortuaries just to name a few of the pathways. The disposal of sludge represents the greatest risk of spreading prion contamination in the environment. Plus, we know that sewage sludge pathogens, pharmaceutical residue and chemical pollutants are taken up by plants and vegetables.”

sewage sludge and disease

Each victim becomes an incubator and a distributor of the Pandora-like pathogen. The human prion is resistant to both heat and chemicals. It’s reported that prions released from people are up to a hundred thousand times more difficult to deactivate than prions from most animals.

Sewage treatment plants can’t detect or stop prions. Dumping sewage sludge (biosolids) from billions of people on land and at sea is reckless. It also spreads heavy metals, radioactive waste, carcinogens, pharmaceuticals and more. The risk assessments for biosolids and wastewater reuse don’t mention prions because there is no answer.

“Although there are many factors contributing to the global epidemic, millions of these deaths could have been prevented,” said Chandler. “In addition to dietary risks, it appears that Alzheimer’s disease is just as infectious as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. There’s no evidence to the contrary.”

“There has been a resurgence of this sort of thinking, because there is now real evidence of the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer’s,” says Thomas Wiesniewski M.D. a prion and Alzheimer’s researcher at New York University School of Medicine. “In fact, this ability to transmit an abnormal conformation is probably a universal property of amyloid-forming proteins (prions).”

  • Women are contracting neurodegenerative disease at twice the rate of men;
  • Caregivers are six times more likely to contract brain disease;
  • People from Finland, Iceland, Sweden and the United States have the highest death rates from Alzheimer’s; and
  • Smart nutrition is the best strategy to avoid brain disease and the only way to effectively treat its symptoms.

There are many more questions than answers, but we know that neurotoxins, head trauma and genetics can all trigger neurodegenerative disease. Unfortunately, that’s where much of the knowledge gets fuzzy. Diagnoses, for example, are just a shot in the dark.

According to Chandler, truth and targeted nutrition are the best defense against environmental contamination and brain disease. His company is producing a documentary that will help promote food safety, wellness and reform. It’s called “Food For Thought.” It offers the most comprehensive guidance available about prevention, aversion and treatment, including vital advice for caregivers and family members.

According to Chandler, pharmaceutical remedies are nonexistent, but nutritional strategies and tactics provide hope and relief from many symptoms. Unfortunately, there is no cure for brain disease, so prevention is paramount.

The film will be produced in both Denver and Phoenix over the next two months. The producers are looking for testimonials and commentary from a variety of stakeholders, including family, caregivers, providers and advocates. For more information, please visit http://alzheimerdisease.tv/

Alzheimer's disease treatment

Order the eBook now and learn how to:

  • Avoid neurotoxins in food, water and the circles of life;
  • Prevent brain disease with targeted nutritional guidance;
  • Effectively treat brain disease with nutritional therapies. It’s the most logical and comprehensive nutritional advice available for neurological disease; and
  • Keep caregivers safe. Misinformation and misdiagnoses are putting them at risk.

Please join our coalition for food safety wellness and reform. Please contact Gary Chandler for more information gary@crossbow1.com

public relations firm Phoenix and Denver

Crossbow Communications is an international marketing and public affairs firm. We can help you influence public opinion, public policy and business decisions around the globe. We can help build your brand, your bottom line and a better world. Our headquarters are in Denver, Colorado. We’re opening a new office in Phoenix, Arizona.

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